C.J. Lawrence Weekly – "The Prospect for Corporate Tax Reform May Be Keeping Bears in Their Dens" - C.J. Lawrence
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C.J. Lawrence Weekly – “The Prospect for Corporate Tax Reform May Be Keeping Bears in Their Dens”

The Prospect for Corporate Tax Reform May Be Keeping Bears in Their Dens

Senator John McCain’s indication that he would not support the Graham-Cassidy Health Care Bill threw more sand into
Washington D.C.’s gears last week. Week-end jockeying may make the bill more palatable to hold-outs, but the machinations
highlight the fact any new legislation faces considerable challenges in making its way through the current congress. Tax
reform looks to be next on the docket, with many Beltway watchers suggesting that corporate tax reform has a better chance of
success than individual income tax reform.

With top marginal corporate tax rates nearing 40%, KPMG lists the United States as having the highest corporate tax rates
globally, among developed countries. Of course, there are nuances in the comparisons, but there appears to be consensus,
even in Washington, that U.S. corporate rates need to be reduced. The timing of legislation is unclear, with most policy
analysts suggesting that 1Q18 or 2Q18 is most likely. We may see a framework for the legislation released this week.

The President has suggested the new corporate rate should be near 15%. While it is unlikely that new legislation will go that
far, even a reduction to 25% would have a meaningful impact on corporate profits. Roughly 70% of S&P 500 constituent
revenue comes from domestic sources. That ratio is higher in U.S. focused sectors like Telecom (96.2%) and Utilities (95.3%),
and lower in global sectors like Materials (53.1%) and Energy (57.6%). For the broader index, if U.S. pre-tax income was taxed
at a 25% rate, instead of the current 33% effective rate, the index could see a ~7.5% boost to net income. That would put S&P
500 EPS estimates (assuming a static share count) for 2018 slightly above $155. Under this scenario, earnings would be up 19%
in 2018 and the current price-earnings multiple on the index would be 16x 2018 estimates. That is a constructive backdrop for
stocks. The prospect of corporate tax reform may encourage hibernating bears to stay in their dens.

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